Microscope Diagram

Microscope diagram below depicts parts of a typical light or optical microscope. Microscope uses lenses and light to optically increase the size of an image of whatever is being magnified. This is achieved through a magnifying glass, which varies in magnification and quality. Other parts of a microscope include eyepiece lens, tube, arm, base, illuminator, stage, rack stop, nosepiece and a diaphragm. Lets discuss each component in more detail.

The Base is the bottom of the microscope. Arms support the tube and are attached to the base. The tube is what integrates the objective lenses to the eyepiece lens. The latter is what a user sees through and is located at the top of the microscope. There are multiple objective lenses in a microscope that come in a variety of magnification powers. The final magnification is a multiple of the eyepiece lens and the objective lens (e.g. 10x eyepiece multiplied by 40x objective gives you 400x magnification). The lens with the lowest magnification are called short and with the highest are referred to as long. The objective lenses are switched with a revolving nosepiece also called a turret. the relevant proximity of these lenses to the slide is adjusted by the rack stop.

Illuminator is the the source of light or a mirror. The mirror microscope uses light from outside to display the image. The light comes from bottom of the stage, which is a platform where slides are inserted between stage clips.

How to Focus a Microscope:
1) Start with the lowest power objective lens.
2) Put the lens down close to the slide.
3) View through the eyepiece and focus upward until the image is sharp.
4) Switch objective lenses for greater magnification while adjusting the focus knob.

Microscope Diagram

microscope-diagram

Cell Diagram

Human cell as most other animal cells make up the structure of the body. Cell diagram below is representative of a typical human cell responsible for carrying out various bodily functions and processing nutrients into energy used to sustain itself. The diagram shows the following elements: nucleus, membrane, ribosomes, lysosome, cytoplasm and others.  Now lets explain what each of the cell parts is responsible for.

Cytoplasm is a part of the cell filled with cytosol liquid surrounding the nucleus. The nucleus is the center of the cell and acts as its control unit responsible for cell growth, division and maturity. Nuclear envelope is the membrane that surrounds the nucleus protecting the DNA from the rest of the cell.

The outside of the cell is protected by the plasma membrane. This membrane allows for passing of the nutrients and waste. An organ that ensures energy from nutrients can be consumed by the cell is called Mitochondria. The Golgi apparatus ensures molecules processed by the endoplasmic reticulum can be passed through the cell.
Peroxisomes and Lysosomes are responsible fore recycling of the worn-out cell parts while also breaking down bacteria and toxins. The cell diagram below lists various cell parts.

cell-diagram

Human Organs – Body Organs Systems

Human Organs make up the six key body systems. These are the skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, digestive system, respiratory system and circulatory system.  Lets explain how each of these play a role in sustaining and functioning of the human body.

Skeletal system provides structure to the body and protects internal organs. It is made of bones, skull and skeleton. The muscular system supports the body and allows it to move. Biceps and triceps are examples of muscles found in this system. The nervous system controls thought, sensation, movement and virtually all body functions. The key part in this is played by the brain.

Digestive system breaks down food and absorbs nutrients. It consists of the stomach, small and large intestines and other parts. The respiratory system takes oxygen and releases carbon dioxide through lungs. Finally the circulatory system with heart at its core transports oxygen, nutrients and other substances to cells and carries away waste.

The below diagram displays where each of these organ systems is located in the human body.

Body Organs Systems

Human Body – Human Anatomy

Human Body Anatomy is one the key areas of study in medical science. Understanding human anatomy is essential not only for medical professionals but also for general public. The diagram below shows various key organs and parts of the human body and is a great learning resource for kids and adults alike.

Human anatomy can be studied on a macro and a micro level. The macro view is called gross anatomy while micro is referred to as histology. In gross anatomy, the human body is studied through systematic and regional methods. Systematic looks at the human body through the lenses of different systems (e.g. circulatory, nervous, etc) while regional studies individual regions (or parts) of the body. Systematic is a more scientific approach as one gets to learn how various organs in the system interact with one another. The anatomy diagram that you see below simply lists various organs such as brain, heart, kidneys, liver, intestines and is more in line with the regional approach.

Human Body

Plant Cell Diagram

Plant Cell is a basic block of the plant structure. The plant cell diagram below displays various parts of the cell including nucleus, cytoskeleton, cell wall, membrane, centrosome, central vacuole, chloroplast and others. Lets explain what each component is responsible for:

The nucleus is the commanding center of the cell controlling various functions of the cell and containing DNA. The nucleus is covered by the nuclear membrane. This is different from the cell membrane, which is a protein layer on the inside of the cell wall. The cell wall is a thick membrane that allows for passing of the nutrients and forms the structure of the plant together with other cells. The jelly material outside of the nucleus is called cytoplasm.

The key difference between plant cells and animals cells is the process of photosynthesis. Plant cells are able to convert sunlight, water and carbon dioxide into sugars (energy), oxygen and water. Photosynthesis takes place in the chloroplasts, which contains chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is a molecule responsible for this process and is usually green in color. The central vacuole stores sugars and water for cell’s use.

Plant cell diagram below lists various cell parts and explains some of their functionality.

Plant Cell Diagram